Conversation Analysis (CA) in Primary School Classrooms

Main Article Content

Alberto Fajardo

Abstract

Although CA deals with all kinds of talk produced in natural contexts, this study focuses its interest on the talk produced in some primary school classrooms. It attempts to develop the construct that CA should move significantly ahead to more practical grounds where its detailed and isolated description causes some effect in improving foreign language teaching, for example. It might be used, for instance, to promote professional development in Colombia. It plans to involve pre-service teachers initially and in-service ones later. The kind of interaction promoted by trainee teachers shows a very restricted possibility for young learners to use the language meaningfully in the classroom. Four stages are defined and suggested as a path to follow with pre-service teachers at Universidad Pedagógica y Tecnológica de Colombia –UPTC– in the Foreign Language Programme - FLP.

Article Details

How to Cite
Fajardo, A. (2008). Conversation Analysis (CA) in Primary School Classrooms. HOW Journal, 15(1), 11-27. Retrieved from https://www.howjournalcolombia.org/index.php/how/article/view/85
Section
Research Reports
Author Biography

Alberto Fajardo, Universidad Pedagógica y Tecnológica de Colombia, Tunja

Alberto Fajardo Castañeda is a full time teacher in the school of Foreign Languages at the UPTC. He holds a Master Degree in Applied Linguistics and he is currently reading for an Integrated PhD in Education and Applied Linguistics in the Faculty of Education and Social Sciences at Newcastle University, England. He was a former Academic Director of the Master Programme in Foreign Language Teaching at the UPTC.

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